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[VIDEO] Marijuana Country: The Cannabis Boom (2015)

By Joanne Ostrow — Harry Smith returns to his Colorado stomping grounds to explore “Marijuana Country: The Cannabis Boom” on CNBC, a one-hour documentary sizing up the state one year after legalization.

Smith covers pot as a treatment for seizures in children (“Charlotte’s Web”), the trouble with dosing edibles, the problem of enforcing zero tolerance in the workplace, the black market, the big businesses hoping to franchise, and sales stats in general — all with a critical eye.

NBC Correspondent Harry Smith and Bob Eschino, Incredibles Founding Partner. Photo provided by CNBC.

Most of these topics have been chronicled extensively by local and national media (The Cannabist reports 9 percent of the state’s population can be considered regular users and counts $573 million in pot sales for 10 months of 2014), but the attention to underground sales is insightful.

Those making deals without legal sanctions call it “donating” and “caregiving,” not buying and selling, Smith notes. Those who choose to avoid dispensaries and call a dealer, er, “caregiver,” spend about one-third the cost of legal recreational weed.

An outsider taking a peek might conclude there has been no disaster, none of the predicted chaos, in Colorado since legalization. The state seems to be finding its way. Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper tells CNBC, “When you’re doing this for the first time, there’s no template.”

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  • Daniel Ray

    Harry Smith is such a good reporter. I would like for him to try Marijuana on camera so he could report from a user point of view. Mississippi has Ballot Initiative #48 circulating to gather enough signatures to put on ballot in November, 2016.

  • theskeptic2

    On the other end of the spectrum:

    From Corrections Corporation of America’s 10K report:

    “The demand for our facilities and services could be adversely affected by the relaxation of enforcement efforts, leniency in conviction or parole standards and sentencing practices or through the decriminalization of certain activities that are currently proscribed by our criminal laws. For instance, any changes with respect to drugs and controlled substances or illegal immigration could affect the number of persons arrested, convicted, and sentenced, thereby potentially reducing demand for correctional facilities to house them.”

    It’s all about the money…

  • CLYDE KENNARD

    What I love about this is all the people that didn’t want to talk about it and didn’t want it to be made legal are the very people that will make all the profit from this. Isn’t life wonderful?

  • PaminIndy

    when is this airing, please???

  • revraygreen

    check it

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